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Fact Citation

Sugar drinks, also called sugar-sweetened beverages, are the largest source of added sugars in the diets of youth. Sugar drinks are high in calories—and consuming too many calories leads to obesity.

HHS/USDA. 2010. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Reedy J, Krebs-Smith SM. Dietary sources of energy, solid fats, and added sugars among children and adolescents in the United States. J Am Diet Assoc 2010; 110(10):1477-84.

Guthrie JF, Morton JF. Food sources of added sweeteners in the diets of Americans. J Am Diet Assoc. 2000; 100:43–51.

Sugar drinks are those to which sweeteners with calories have been added. High-fructose corn syrup, sucrose (table sugar), and other sweeteners add calories to these types of drinks, without adding any nutrients

The CDC Guide to Strategies for Reducing the Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages ,March 2010.  http://www.cdph.ca.gov/SiteCollectionDocuments/StratstoReduce_Sugar_Sweetened_Bevs.pdf.  Accessed July 17, 2013.

Did you know? Adolescent males consume, on average, around 300 calories from sugar drinks each day. That means over 100,000 calories are just from these beverages each year

Reedy J, Krebs-Smith SM. Dietary sources of energy, solid fats, and added sugars among children and adolescents in the United States. J Am Diet Assoc 2010; 110(10):1477-84.

There are 16-18 teaspoons of sugar in a 20 oz. soda.

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference. 

Drinking sports and energy drinks can lead to obesity, heart disease, and diabetes -

Vartanian LR, Schwartz MB, Brownell KD. Effects of Soft Drink Consumption on Nutrition and Health: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Am J Public Health 2007; 97(4):667-675.

Drinking one soda a day can equal an extra 25 pounds of weight per year.

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference.

Sugar-loaded beverages are the single major source of added sugar consumed by the average American.

HHS/USDA. 2010. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, Washington DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Reedy J, Krebs-Smith SM. Dietary sources of energy, solid fats, and added sugars among children and adolescents in the United States. J Am Diet Assoc 2010 Oct; 110(10):1477-84.